Menudo Rojo

This is the kind of dish that evokes strong opinions, at least where I live. There are devoted lovers of menudo, and there are avid haters. (Obviously, I’m of the former group, or I wouldn’t be posting a recipe.) Rarely do I meet someone who is on the fence. When faced with a steaming, spicy, filling, healing stew (some say it’s a hangover cure), with a mountain of tortillas to enjoy alongside, why would anyone despise this dish? Most of the time, it has to do with tripe. Tripe is scary, gross, or otherwise unthinkable to some. It’s not a “normal” cut of meat in my part of the world, so it’s frowned upon and shunned in favor of the fancier cuts. My opinion? That we should cozy up to tripe – give tripe a chance!

What is tripe? Tripe is made from the first three chambers of an animal’s stomach (usually beef). The type most commonly found in Latin markets and most commonly used in menudo is honeycomb tripe, which comes from the third chamber. You will most likely find it already thoroughly cleaned, so it will look white, have a honeycomb texture, and should have very little odor to it, if any at all. (Sometimes you might find a grayish version – this type needs to be rinsed well and boiled for a while to remove any grittiness.) The advantages to tripe? If you’re into nose-to-tail eating, tripe will definitely need to be considered. (I’m in favor of sustainable eating. Shouldn’t be throwing away perfectly good parts just because they’re not steaks or roasts. Sometimes, the offal is the true delicacy.) It’s a good, inexpensive source of animal protein – it sells for a fraction of the price of other cuts of beef. Most of the time, all that cleaning is done for you at the butcher, so it is not extremely difficult to prepare. It also adds a lovely textural contrast to soups – simmered long enough, it becomes slightly chewy, but also giving and soft. It is not strongly flavored, and is more apt to take on the flavors added in a recipe than imparting its own. It is a key component in menudo, one of the more popular Mexican soups available.

Menudo is traditionally enjoyed for breakfast, often on New Years’ Day, but can be enjoyed on just about any weekend morning. Imagine a large bowl, filled with chili-spiced pork broth, bits of pork and tripe, hominy, laced with lime juice, and garnished with onion, cilantro, and fresh chiles. You pick up a fresh corn tortilla, roll it up, and dip a bit in the soup, and enjoy. Spoonful after spoonful opens your weary eyes with a spicy kick, and your whole body warms and is awakened. If you’re like me, that heat, complimented by the fresh lime and cilantro, is an addictive, delicious combination.  It’s an amazing thing when salty, fiery, meaty, and piquant flavors combine – it’s almost an explosion that knocks you back, but keeps you coming back for more. You might decide that this should become a regular meal in your rotation, especially in chilly months. (Of course, I could enjoy menudo any time of year!) For me, this is a comfort food – the warmth that the soup gives my body brings a sense of calm and happiness. Why that is, I’m not sure. I just know this is good stuff.

If you’ve been shy about tripe before, give it a try in menudo. Cut it into small, manageable bits, so that you can enjoy bite-sized morsels without feeling overwhelmed. You might find that you enjoy this new nose-to-tail eating thing, and feel better for it. Menudo will cure what ails you!

Menudo Rojo, adapted from Diana Kennedy’s The Art of Mexican Cooking

1 ½ lbs honeycomb tripe, rinsed well and cut into 1-inch squares

2 pigs feet (trotters), halved

1 large yellow onion, diced

3 cloves garlic, peeled

8 peppercorns

2 t kosher salt, or to taste

2 t Mexican oregano

4 quarts water

4 dried ancho chiles

3 dried guajillo chiles

1 large Hatch chile (or Anaheim or poblano), roasted, peeled, and chopped (can substitute canned green chiles)

1 15-oz can white hominy, drained

1 t ground cumin

To serve:

Dried oregano

Limes

Chopped onions

Chopped cilantro

Corn tortillas

Place the tripe, pigs feet, onion, garlic, peppercorns, salt, oregano, and water in a large stockpot or soup pot. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Allow to simmer uncovered for about 2 hours, or until the tripe and foot are tender but not too soft.

Meanwhile, remove the stems and seeds from the chiles and toast on a dry skillet for about 30 seconds or until fragrant. Pour enough water to cover, and allow to simmer at a low heat, soaking the chiles.

Remove the pigs feet from the pot and set aside. When cool enough to touch, remove the fleshy parts and either tear into small pieces or chop, and return to pot. Add the hominy and Hatch chile to the pot.

Remove the soaking chiles from the water and place in a blender along with the cumin. Ladle about a cup of the simmering broth from the pot into the blender, and puree until very smooth. (Add additional broth if necessary) Pour chile puree into the simmering pot and stir in. Allow to cook for about 2 hours (or more) a low simmer. Season with additional salt as necessary.

Serve in large bowls, with oregano, limes, onions, cilantro, and tortillas at the table for each guest to customize their own bowl.

Serves 8.

Comments

  1. says

    I have had pig’s feet, but never tripe OR menudo! I think I am going to have give this one a try. My hubby is very adventurous when it comes to his cuts of meet. This might be a good time to try. Interesting that this is usually served for breakfast. I did not realize that!
    And your photo is absolutely BEAUTIFUL!!! ;)

    • sandra says

      what makes me laugh is that it is usually served for breakfast because its a hangover cure. Mexican Traditions go Tamales, Capiortada, and sugar cookes for Christmass, Menudo or Posole for New Years eve evening cause the leftovers are for the hangover.
      It was also a poor mans soup in the winters when Mexican/Americans would not have field work this would be one of the economical foods chilies that were dried over the summer would be used as seasoning, tripe and pigs feets were the throwable food in the meat market. a Poor mans soup

  2. says

    Pigs feet yes but can’t say that I have ever had tripe. My parents were haters having been forced to eat it growing up and choosing not to prepare it for us.

  3. says

    I have to be honest, I have a little trouble with the “tripe” thing. Always have, even when I lived in New Mexico and it was a common ingredient in local cooking. But, having said that, this recipe of yours looks like it would be divine as a launching pad for a vegetarian or pork posole. You’re right though, menudo is a great way to add some inexpensive animal protein to a recipe. I also love your combination of different chiles. That adds such depth to blends like this. Red chile is a comfort food to me as well and your photo of that gorgeous “bowl of red” with the corn tortillas and limes is mouth-watering. I might have to make a version of this today.

    I also love the fact that you wrote about something so unique. Even though I probably won’t be adding tripe to my diet anytime soon, I loved this post!

    Melissa

  4. says

    It’s been a while since I have had tripe, but I do remember all of the great characteristics of tripe that you write about in this post. I just loved the texture after it’s had time to cook, leftovers were always better because it has had extra time to simmer. Diane Kennedy has excellent south of the border recipes, and this is one stew that I should definitely revisit.

  5. Jane says

    The recipe looks great. A friend made me some trad menudo like his mom used to make- and he used calf’s feet rather than pig’s. He told me where to get all the ingreds- at one of the small markets where we live. It tasted great- I was one of the childhood tripe haters- English style tripe is boiled and thoroughly rubbery, from what I remember :-). I was afraid to eat much of the soup til I checked out the ingreds tho- I have Celiac and he couldn’t explain if the calve’s feet were uncured or not… (does anyone know this?) a lot of cured stuff has gluten. Taste was amazing.

    • altawrites says

      Jane, I haven’t purchased calves’ feet before, but I know pigs’ feet are uncured. They’re just raw meat. I’d assume calves’ feet are typically the same.

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