Kids In The Kitchen: Seafood Gumbo

Brandan immediately decided he wanted to make squid for his turn in the kitchen. Squid? Okay, but I have little experience with squid. I suggested calamari, but he wasn’t interested. He wasn’t sure what he wanted to do, so we simply started to google “squid recipes”. I came across a gumbo recipe, and before I even read through it, he really wanted to make gumbo with squid. The decision was made. Only then did I thoroughly read through the recipe, and decided it was not a good recipe to follow. And then I started wondering whether squid was ever used in gumbo in the first place – I can’t think of a single Cajun or Creole dish that uses squid. I would have to improvise to make this work.

I have not made many gumbos in my life. There is one gumbo that is routinely made in our household – Emeril Lagasse’s Turkey Gumbo Ya-Ya. It’s awesome. And it’s not something I usually make – this is my husband’s signature dish, made only around the holidays. But I figured, if Emeril has come through for us in this dish, and others, such as my Shrimp Etouffee, why not here? I found a Seafood Gumbo recipe, and started from there, changing it up to accomodate a gluten-free diet, to include squid, and to simplify it somewhat, so that a 13-year-old boy could tackle it. (Gumbo is a long process!)

It was a success – even Brittany, who upon seeing the squid uttered “Eww, gross!”, loved her gumbo. While I wouldn’t necessarily recommend squid in a gumbo, as it doesn’t really add much to the dish (the flavor of squid is subtle, and was somewhat lost in the heat of the gumbo broth), it certainly didn’t detract from it either.  Adding it at the last minute rendered the squid tender, not rubbery – a fear I had when composing this dish. Brandan, of course, had two bowlfuls. We might consider keeping a version of this dish on the menu, sans the squid and expensive crab. I imagine a cheaper, but no less delicious, version could include some smoked sausage or andouille, plus double the shrimp. Regardless of the proteins included, this was a filling and warming dish.

Now, I promise you, the next post will not be a soup. I am beginning to feel like this blog should be re-named “Tasty Soups At Home.” Perhaps a bit of variety is needed, no?

 

Seafood Gumbo, adapted from Emeril Lagasse

1/2 c canola oil

¼ c sorghum flour

¼ c sweet rice flour

2 stalks celery, diced

1 medium onion, diced

1 green pepper, diced

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 c white wine

4 cups vegetable broth

1 8-oz bottle clam juice

1 bay leaf

¼ t dried thyme

½ -1 T salt

½ t cayenne pepper

2 t Worcestershire sauce

1 lb frozen shrimp

1 cup fresh crabmeat

1 lb squid, sliced thinly

¼ c fresh chopped parsley

¼ c chopped green onion tops

White rice, for serving

Place a large dutch oven or stock pot over medium heat, and add the oil. Allow to heat for about 5 minutes, and add in the flours. Stir for 20-25 minutes until the roux is the color of milk chocolate. Add the celery, onion, and bell pepper and stir to blend. Cook for 3 minutes, stirring, then add the garlic. Cool the garlic for 30 seconds before adding the wine, vegetable stock, and clam juice. Add the bay leaf, thyme, salt, cayenne, and Worcestershire sauce. Bring to a boil, and reduce to a simmer. Continue to simmer for 1 hour, stirring occasionally. If a good deal of oil or scum rises to the surface, skim it off.

Season the shrimp, crab, and squid with salt and pepper. Add the shrimp to the pot and cook for 2 minutes. Add the crab and squid to the pot and cook for an additional 2 minutes. Taste the gumbo and adjust seasonings as necessary.

Garnish with parsley and green onions and serve with rice.

Makes 4-6 servings.

Comments

  1. says

    The color of the stock is just gorgeous! Shrimp and crawfish together are so nice in a seafood gumbo – maybe next time? And no, there can never be too much soup at this time of year, don’t you worry, girly!

  2. says

    Don’t forget the file’ gumbo! Does two things to a classic gumbo or jambalaya … thickens, and adds the unmistakable flavor of the file’, which is ground sassafras leaves. Nice recipe, by the way! You may also want to look at Paul Prudhomme’s “A Fork In The Road.” This was an attempt to scale down his fat-heavy recipes for a time, and there’s some good stuff to draw from in there.

  3. says

    this sounds delicious – and looks great! :) congrats on another successful family dish. and i certainly don’t mind all the soup recipes! ;)

  4. says

    Good choice!!! Gumbo is so good. Brandan has more guts that I do. I have yet to tackle the squid in cooking. I have tackled one in a dream before, though i’m not sure what it meant.

  5. says

    Woohoo for Brandan once again! That’s a beautiful dish. I like squid best in calamari, but haven’t made it gluten free yet (it’s on the list!). I love how kids eat so much when they make the dish. Kids in the kitchen definitely makes sense. :-)

    Thanks for sharing! I don’t mind several batches of soup in a row. That’s all we’ve eaten the last few days here. It’s just so cold and soup hits the spot.

    Shirley

  6. says

    Hello
    This recipe looks so nice and delicious.Well I really want to try this recipe of seafood Gumbo as I have never tasted it.I have to collect all these ingredients.Thanks for this tasty and yummy recipe.

  7. says

    Wow looks great. I just typed a huge paragraph and forgot to add my name and it deleted my nice thought. Anyway. Great gumbo! I bet everyone chowed down.
    Concerning the tempeh, I believe it is gluten-free. At least the one I puchased from Trader Joes was a whole grain tempeh using soybeans, brown rice and millet so you might be fine using it. I read in many cookbooks that pan frying tempeh is the most flavorful so I am glad I tried that first but I am looking forward using it in other ways. Have a good one!

    • tastyeatsathome says

      Noelle – Thanks for the info on tempeh – gonna try it again!

      Jenn – Not sure what that means either! Well, this was our first squid attempt, but I didn’t cook it that long, so it didn’t get rubbery. That’d be my only advice – don’t overcook it! :)

      Larry – Thanks for that info! I haven’t tried to use file powder yet. I’ve had one bad gumbo once, where someone used too much file, and it gave an “off” taste. Guess it scared me off of the stuff. I do love okra for gumbo though…but the rest of the family doesn’t. I definitely need to branch out in my gumbos though!

      Tasty Trix – Crawfish, forgot about that, but very much YES! I love crawfish, and in gumbos and etouffes, they’re superb.

      Jessica Meyer, Ruth, pegasuslegend, SimplyLife, OrangeTruffle, Conor, glucosamine, shirley, shirley@gfe, lk, and Brie – Thank you! I’m glad everyone likes the soups. You haven’t seen the last of them!

  8. says

    Awesome recipe. It sounds like everyone had fun. I think it’s great how you involve your kids in the kitchen. My kids love it as well.

  9. says

    Hey Alta.. your seafood gumbo looks so tasty. It’s almost midnight and I can feel myself getting hungry so this isn’t helping. We recently made gumbo as well, but haven’t posted our recipe yet. Nice job on Emeril’s version!

  10. says

    That is a serious list of ingredients. I’m happy when my kids successfully complete a cookie dough recipe. And I’m even more impressed by kids eating gumbo. My kids MIGHT taste gumbo if it came in a happy meal box. How did this happen to a vegetarian, vegetable-growing mom??? Sigh…

  11. says

    brandon is simply a talented cook who loves to experiment different ingredients. look at this soup, it just looks intelligently delicious!

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